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This sections contains a database of documents on child trafficking. Users can research by title, author, editor/organization, type, topic, keywords, geographic descriptors and year of publication.
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Type of document: News
Topic: Law enforcement
Geographic descriptors: United States of America
Language: English
Source: www.sciencedaily.com/upi/?feed=TopNews&article=UPI-1-20060118-11005500-bc-us-childtrafficking.xml
Date of publication: 18 January 2006
Long Abstract: Parents accused of child trafficking

TRENTON, Tenn., Jan. 18 (UPI) -- A Tennessee couple's trial on child trafficking charges looks to highlight how legally adopted children are moved without state knowledge, a report said.

Debra and Tom Schmitz of Trenton, Tenn., are accused of abusing some of their 18 children, most of whom are adopted and disabled. The alleged abuse included beatings, putting children in cages and holding their heads under water in the strict disciplinary practice known as attachment therapy. The couple also is accused of child trafficking for moving a girl to Arizona without state permission. They lacked legal custody for seven of the 18 children, who have been in foster care since June 2004.

Prosecutors told USA Today that some of the adopted children, the Schmitz's natural daughter and home nurses will testify against the couple during a trial set to begin Jan. 30.

The Schmitzes, who earned up to $9,000 a month in subsidies, have denied the allegations.

The trial will highlight the underground U.S. network of people who move adopted children to new homes without state permission or knowledge, the newspaper reported.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International. All Rights Reserved.

Files: ( .doc 27 KB )

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